Subscribe to Upset
Get Upset delivered direct to your door anywhere on the planet, every month. Get more info here.
In the mag...
Featuring Architects, You Me At Six, The Pretty Reckless, Frank Iero and loads more.
Order a copy
February 2021

Matt Skiba and the Sekrets - Kuts

★★★
Matt Skiba and the Sekrets - Kuts
Published: 6:26 am, June 01, 2015
[vc_row css=".vc_custom_1429970155018{margin-bottom: 25px !important;border-bottom-width: 5px !important;border-bottom-color: #0a0a0a !important;border-bottom-style: solid !important;}" column_padding="" max_width="" equal_height="" full_height="" vertical_center="" enable_parallax="" parallax_speed="0.5" mouse_scroll=""][vc_column width="1/4" css=".vc_custom_1429970165982{margin-bottom: 25px !important;}" skrollr="" skrollr_speed="100" full_height="" enable_parallax="" parallax_speed="0.5"][vc_single_image img_size="full" full_width="" alignment="center" lightbox="" image="3681" img_size="full"][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4" css=".vc_custom_1429970174266{margin-bottom: 25px !important;}" skrollr="" skrollr_speed="100" full_height="" enable_parallax="" parallax_speed="0.5"][vc_column_text]

An album that, while simply being blindly catchy at times and leaving a lot of lulls, doubles as a half-hour burst of fun


Label: Superball Music
Released: 1st June 2015

Rating: ★★★[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]

As if the day job of Alkaline Trio and new bit-on-the-side co-fronting Blink-182 wasn't enough to satisfy that creative itch, Matt Skiba has returned to his musical incarnation the Sekrets to deliver an exciting dose of nostalgia for decades gone by.


In vacation-mode from punk of both the regular and pop variety, he's instead let other influences in: The Cure and Bowie pepper the entire record. 'Lonely and Kold' immediately hooks the listener with its infectious catchiness twined with his own brand of pop sensibility, slightly more melancholy than the average Joe's.  'She Wolf' is angular and sharp, twanging straight to the audience's heart; 'She Said' is Billy Idol with a few extra curses thrown in for good measure.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1433359110492{padding-top: 20px !important;padding-bottom: 20px !important;}" column_padding="" max_width="" equal_height="" full_height="" vertical_center="" enable_parallax="" parallax_speed="0.5" mouse_scroll=""][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_video link="
"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1429974559848{margin-bottom: 25px !important;}" column_padding="" max_width="" equal_height="" full_height="" vertical_center="" enable_parallax="" parallax_speed="0.5" mouse_scroll=""][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]

It seems difficult to accuse someone of being "too catchy", but at times the push for that immediate hook at times acts as a blockade to developing songs to a fuller potential. 'Never  Believe' doesn't do much other than simmer along nicely and 'Way Bakk When' brings candyfloss-sweet keys, but doesn't really go anywhere beyond that.


'Krazy' and 'I Just Killed To Say I Love You' successfully smack of the more subtle gravitas Skiba seemed to aim for with much of the album, the dramatic chorus actually punting the song up a level before fading back into the verse. These are the moments you cling to in an album that, while simply being blindly catchy at times and leaving a lot of lulls, doubles as a half-hour burst of fun. Heather McDaid

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]
CONTACT PRIVACY ADVERTISE

© 2018 The Bunker Publishing