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June 2020

A Perfect Circle cement their status as masters of the emotive, the experimental, and the avant-garde

★★★★★
A Perfect Circle cement their status as masters of the emotive, the experimental, and the avant-garde
Published: 10:32 am, April 17, 2018

'Eat The Elephant' is a dramatic albeit grandiose departure from the aggressive post-metal of their past.

Label: BMG
Released: 20th April 2018
Rating: ★★★★★

In 2004, the world was a whole lot less complicated. Our faces weren’t glued to screens, we weren’t looking over our shoulders so much, and a follower count wasn’t even a thing. Maynard James Keenan, Billy Howerdel and their alt-metal super-group A Perfect Circle shelved their palate of avant-garde aggression in the same year, following their anti-war protest covers album, eMOTIve. They’ve been playing shows again since 2010, and yet between Puscifer, The Beta Machine, all those Tool rumours, and a whole bunch of wine-making, they’ve only now found the time to release their long-awaited follow-up.

'Eat The Elephant' is a dramatic albeit grandiose departure from the aggressive post-metal of their past, replacing the friction of Judith with a progressive evolution of their gentler moments, hinted at previously on the likes of 3 Libras and The Noose.

In a world where big brother quite literally is watching you, Messrs Howerdel and Keenan have crafted a collection of songs that seep through into your skin, etching the emotive essence of paranoia and anxiety through minimalistic suites of progressive-addled post-metal. Gentle piano strokes underlying textural, rhythmic patterns provide a desert for Keenan’s goose-bump vocals to haunt on the titular opener while synthetic synths slide across electro-progressive plains on Hourglass, while A Perfect Circles past collides with their present in a sensory attack of sounds on the accessibly-aggressive TalkTalk.

Through lyrics questioning and critiquing inequality, mortality, and the complexities of life, Eat The Elephant is an expansive hour-long journey through the darker depths of the human emotion, masterfully conveying feelings you haven’t felt.

Over a decade since their last display of studio wizardry, you’d be forgiven for approaching 'Eat The Elephant' with an ounce or two of hesitation - however, if you do, you’ll be proven undeniably wrong. A Perfect Circle cement their status as masters of the emotive, the experimental, and the avant-garde. Jack Press

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