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Brawlers – Romantic Errors Of Our Youth

Brawlers – Romantic Errors Of Our Youth

★★★★

Brawlers – Romantic Errors Of Our Youth

Brawlers may have taken some time to release their debut full-length but, in this case, great things come to those who wait.

Label: Alcopop! Records
Released: 6th April 2015

Rating: ★★★★

Despite being released in the midst of the United Kingdom’s equivalent of the rainy season, there’s something distinctly summery running throughout the suitably uncomplicated sound on ‘Romantic Errors Of Our Youth’. Underpinned by its penchant for unquestionably British story-telling, Brawlers display a carefree joviality on their debut full-length that will bring a smile to even the most hardened of faces.

Their subject matter is not overtly serious; instead their brilliance sits within their whimsical conversational tone. The majority of the record centres around everyday difficulties in relationships, dominated by the youthful exuberance and naivety suggested in the album’s title. Deep and meaningful metaphors are few and far between, yet to suggest superficiality would be a mistake.

In embracing the everyday trials and tribulations of love, and layering it over playfully energetic rock and roll, Brawlers have developed an enchanting sound. ‘Romantic Errors Of Our Youth’ has a joyful innocence that sits comfortably next to the band’s extensive experience.

Each track showcases expert skill; be it in the quirks of ‘Drink And Dial’, the reinvigorating ‘Windowmisser’, the high-octane ‘Two Minutes’ or the comparably anthemic title-track closer. Led by a fair portion of punk, Brawlers have clearly been influenced by the wealth of scenes they have called home during their time. Each slight shift in sound compliments the lyrics perfectly, forging a positive and uplifting experience.

Brawlers may have taken some time to release their debut full-length but, in this case, great things come to those who wait. Youthful, energetic and rejuvenating, this is the perfect way to recover from any personal romantic errors, and an absolutely joy to listen to. Ben Tipple

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