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Turnover: “We’re always thinking forward”

From the graphic introduction of ‘Cutting My Finger Off’ through to solemn realisation of ‘Intrapersonal’, Turnover’s ‘Peripheral Vision’ is a record of growth. The lyrical content is rooted in the past and the shimmering echo that surrounds it, conjures a wistful longing for lazy days gone by. Overcoming their past, Turnover march forward.

Seven months after the release of ‘Peripheral Vision’ and the band, “still really enjoy the record. We can still put it on and listen and enjoy it thoroughly. Of course there are things that we’re critical about but overall we’re very proud of it,” explains vocalist/guitarist Austin Getz.
Formed in 2009 and making a name for themselves in the world of pop-punk, ‘Peripheral Vision’ is a mark of change for the band. More introspective, lush and spacious than their previous works, this album better reflects the band Turnover have grown into. However, this isn’t the destination. “We’re always thinking forward and progression is natural. ‘Peripheral Vision’ is a stepping stone in the bigger picture, but that isn’t taking anything away from its place with us.”

Embraced by people, “as much and much more than we could have ever asked for,” the reaction to ‘Peripheral Vision’ has been “wonderful.” It’s seen the band play over 114 shows this year with the likes of New Found Glory, Fireworks, Pianos Become The Teeth, Basement and a whole heap of other greats but Turnover refuse to pick a favourite. “That’s rough. We love a lot of the people we have toured with and met this year.” Spoilsports.

Those live shows sit on a level with the acclaim for the brilliant ‘Peripheral Vision’ with, “Either one without the other is missing something. “

However you listen, Turnover want their music to cause “whatever personal experience it evokes. Something unique and real that resonates with them.” It’s an understandable desire, especially when you consider the confessional nature of the lyrics. Lost love, guilt and self-doubt are all served with a heavy dose of nostalgia but, “Performing the songs with that lyrical content hasn’t really ever been something cathartic for me,” explains Austin. “Any self doubt and relief from that is usually created and resolved in my own mind.”

With the band constantly moving forward, the future is assured but difficult to pin down. There’s a UK tour with Citizen at the start of 2016 but after that “Who knows?” With their ‘Peripheral Vision’ so confident, Turnover look set to continue their flourish.