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Album Review

All Dogs – Kicking Every Day

All Dogs - Kicking Every Day

Rediscovering hope with a poignant determination, All Dogs take the listener by the hand.

Label: Salinas Records
Released: 28th August 2015

Rating: ★★★★

It feels like All Dogs were purpose made to shoot straight for the heart. With the group dividing their time between other outlets, there’s more talent here than just one band can hold on to. In the midst of these various projects, the Ohio four-piece’s debut album squalls through every emotion they’ve got, baring their soul to make a connection.

There’s something intrinsically resigned in their music. Tales of loss and self-deprecation ring with a dull heartache that feels all too familiar. But performed with the quartet’s unfailing energy, the group find purpose amidst the pain – reason to keep fighting and kicking every day.

From the sorrow-dwelling ‘Black Hole’ through to the lingering desperate need of ‘The Garden’, the quartet looks their issues straight in the eye. Lead album track ‘That Kind Of Girl’ might own up to character traits that make relationships hard work, but it makes no apology. The song asserts itself, fuelled by the drive to preserve and improve its own existence.

‘How Long’ takes a similar standpoint, crying out for self-acceptance over a layered haze of storming guitars, whilst ‘Sunday Morning’ falls into the despair completely, admitting that day is not yet here. It’s something everyone battles with, but All Dogs have made it sound bewitching.

The band’s knack for forceful hooks and compelling rhythms drive the record throughout, but the defining feature of the group’s sound is Maryn Jones’ captivating vocal. Carrying songs from soft and sombre to a frenzied force, she ties together All Dogs’ unapologetic nature and raucous aesthetic, guiding the listener through her worries and her fears.

‘Kicking Every Day’ is a soundtrack from after the darkness. Rediscovering hope with a poignant determination, All Dogs take the listener by the hand, and show them that no matter how long the space between the two, beauty can follow a battle. Jess Goodman